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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
on capitol hill about benghazi before leaving the pentagon. >> that is right. he hadn't planned to. but the threats from some lawmakers to potentially hold up a vote on chuck hagel on panetta's replacement pressed the pentagon to have panetta go up on to capitol hill to testify before the senate armed services committee next thursday. that is the same day that the senate is expected to vote on hagel's nomination. meanwhile, secretary of state john kerry was sworn in today during a private ceremony on capitol hill. he made headlines telling the boston globe president obama picked him for the job a week before susan rice withdrew her name over the benghazi controversy, which is a different timeline of what we have known before now. bret? jennifer griffin, live from the state department. thank you. 17% of male marines say they will leave the corps if women move in combat positions. in the survey done before the pentagon announced women could serve in combat, male marines worried about being falsely accused of sexual harassment or assault. >>> still ahead, remembering a new york origin
the president's pick to head to the pentagon. why chuck hagel is facing bitter opposition and he's fighting back. >>> and blackberry, a new operating system and a new name. but is it enough to survive? if there was a pill to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. music: "make someone happy" music: "make someone happy" ♪it's so important to make someone happy.♪ it's so important to make meone happy.♪ ♪make just one someone happy ♪and you will be happy too. >>> john kerry had no trouble sailing through the senate confirmation process but president obama's pick for defense secretary is facing a much tougher road. the former senator chu
of quadruple amputations. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >>> actor, ashton kutcher didn't mess around as he got into character to play the late steve jobs. he studied the late apple ceo so intensely, he adopted his famously radical diet. cbs 5 reporter tells us, it didn't set well with the hollywood star. kit. >> yeah, ashton kutcher e mersed himself in this role by eating nothing but fruits, nuts, and seeds for some time. it may have worked, but it sent him to the hospital in excruciating pain. >> your instinct wanted something that didn't exist. you just wheeled it into existence. >> to get ready for his role as steve jobs. ashton kutcher got into his head, heart, and stomach. kutcher studied for hours. mimicking his walking style. that is kutcher on the left with a little makeup. the resemblance is uncanning. today, we learn that kutcher took it to the extreme and went on one of job's all fruit diets. the actor became a fruitarian and paid the price. >> first, the diet is severe issues. i ended up two days before we started shooting the movie, it was like my -- i was like doubl
-israel, homophobic politicians eager to get the pentagon's budget. pushback during meetings appears to have been effective, said an official helping him to prepare for the hearing. the effort to vilify hagel and his record as remain at a bus but has not reached the type of crescendo that has doomed high- profile political nominations in the past. 'we have had a very impressive strategy for tackling some of the issues that have been raised,' the hagel aide said on wednesday, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss the nomination's outlook. that is not to say that the confirmation is a foregone conclusion, supporters concede. critics have piled on to the initial critiques with charges that hagel's ties to defense contractors and other private sector firms may create conflict of interest. senator carl levin, the chair of the senate armed services committee, says that hagel will face tough questions about his past demands. democrats outnumber republicans on the panel 14-12, but committee insiders are not assuming that hagel will get the votes of every democrat. 'the confirmation will not b
a trillion dollars. also, $1.8 billion from tri-care, healthcare for the veterans. also, the pentagon announced today that 46,000 jobs will be cut due to budget cuts. the saddest headline today and has me the most upset is one the troops in afghanistan are not getting breakfast. look at the headline. they are cutting back on meals for the soldiers. the guys put their lives on the lines every day. the guys and gals. we should give them a warm breakfast; particularly, in the draw down to thank them for wha
attitude. jennifer griffin is live at the pentagon. one month from surgery, and it seems the soldier has big plans and a bigger spirit. >> reporter: that's right. this is what he said when asked what he missed most in the past four years. >> driving. absolutely. driving. i used to love to drive. it was... it was a lot of fun for me. so, i am really looking forward to getting back to that and just becoming an rathlite again. one of my goals definitely is to cycle a marathon. yeah. so i would love to get back to that. >> the most proud and unassuming guy and stubbornly persistent, his doctors said. he has an amazing sense of humor. when he came out of surgery last month, he turned to his mom and said, i love you. those were his first words. >> it feels amazing. it's something i was waiting for for a long time. now that it finally happened... i really don't know what to say because it's just such a big thing for my life. it's fantastic. >> brend an has been recovering and the tunnel to towers foundation, which built him a special home have been busy fixing the damage to the home caused by s
point telling the committee that he needs to learn more about the pentagon saying quote if confirmed i intend to know a lot more than i do. jonathan karl, abc news the white house. >> we have update coming into the newsroom about that accident at mexico state oil facility. 25 people are now dead few minutes ago we had the number at 14. now 4525. still roughly 100 injured after explosion and fire there in mexico city. >> california taxpayers are on the hook. you and me tonight for billions of dollars more than expected because of new school construction. investigation by our media partner california watch found that some school districts desperate for cash have used a form of creative financing that carries a very high cost for future generations. >>reporter: napa valley unified school district promised to keep taxes low when it built this new high school in american canyon. >> our promise to the voters of napa was to keep the tax bill at or below 39 or 36 and we were able to accomplish that. >>reporter: but there wasn't enough monto finish the project so the district resorted to
's prompted by french military actions against jihadist in northwest africa. let's go live to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. she's got the latest. barbara? >> the administration has been saying for months now that al qaeda is on the ropes but the u.s. intelligence committee is now saying something very different about a very different al qaeda threat. with the success of the attack on a guest plant in algeria, extremists are growing more daring. a senior u.s. intelligence official tells cnn, quote, what we have seen is intelligence suggesting the desire to carry out more attacks against western and u.s. interests in the region. though there are no specific targets yet that the u.s. knows of, one of those plotting mokhtar belmokhtar was behind the algeria attack. >> we are starting to see an increasing collaboration, sharing of funding, sharing recruiting efforts, sharing of weapons and explosives, and certainly sharing of ideology that is expanding and connecting these various organizations. >> if chuck hagel becomes the next secretary of defense, he already knows what he's faci
camerota. rough ride for pick to run the pentagon. chuck hagel's hearing questions questions his competence. the white house thinks he did just fine? >> we are moments away from finding out whether we are stuck with six more weeks of winter. punxsutawney phil about to give his first alert forecast. let's all say it now, gobbler's knob. that's where we are going. >> punxsutawney, pennsylvania. the big easy gearing up for the big game. brian kilmeade is on the bayou with some huge guests. we are going to look for his shadow as well. "fox & friends" hour two starts right now. >> happy groundhogs day. >> good saturday afternoon, good morning, i don't know. saturday morning. >> it is afternoon somewhere. >> maybe in new zealand it's saturday afternoon. good morning, everyone. we are just a few days away from brian kilmeade being able to watch the game live super bowl game live. there is brian kilmeade staring at cheerleaders. >> it's the 49ers facing off against the ravens. super bowl number 47. good morning to you, brian. what's you got for us? >> first up, i think it's time to meet some of the
announcements coming out of the pentagon. i was looking at one just now because i was trying to remember the numbers. the pentagon is beefing up its cyber security force. the other one that is apparently being beefed up in these times of budgetary constraints or the special forces. tom, would you talk about that generally, and fred, if you talk about that in the broader nature of it. then we will get to the nonexistent challenge that faces us in asia. >> these new capabilities, cyber operations or whatever you want to call them, are certainly necessary and needed, and our ability to exploit the electromagnetic spectrum configured as the internet is pretty critical. it is not qualitatively different from other forms of intelligence gathering or attempts either by propaganda means or by direct attack took back the military or strategic situations. to some degree it is understandable, but as fred alluded, particularly direct action special operations unit don't just magically appear and sustain themselves. if you have seen "zero dark thirty, is a great picture of how the intelligence manhun
've seen two budget-related announcements coming out of the pentagon. one, i was looking up just now because i was trying to remember the numbers, and that is that the pentagon is beefing up its cybersecurity force, taking it from 900 to 4,000 and putting a few billion dollars into it. the other one that is apparently being beefed up in these times of budgetary constraints are the special forces. tom, would you just talk about that generally and then, fred, if you would talk about that not just in afghanistan, but in the broader battle and the nature of it, and then we'll come over to publish shah and the non-- membership shah and the nonexistent challenge that faces us in asia. [laughter] >> i'll try to be brief, dani. look, these new capabilities, you know, cyber operations or whatever you want to call them are certainly necessary and needed, and our ability to exploit, you know, the electromagnetic spectrum configured as the internet is, you know, pretty critical. but it's not qualitatively different from other forms of intelligence gathering or, you know, attempts to either by pr
believe he's the wrong person to lead the pentagon at this perilous and consequential time. >> so far only one republican senator endorsed hagel, senator thad cochrane of mississippi. >>> a teenager gunned down in chicago is the new face of the gun battle. and the control over guns as well. hadiya pentle ton's family members support using her death to help shape the debate to make a point. it was just a week ago monday the 15-year-old and some of her high school classmates were performing at the president's inauguration. tuesday of this week she was shot to death. just blocks away from the obama's home in chicago. she was the 42nd person killed in that city this month alone. ted rollins joins us. that's an unbelievable figure. these are children, teenagers. it's hard to even wrap your head around that kind of -- that number when you think that those kids are being killed in that city at that rate. what's going on? >> well, to be clear it was the 42nd murder of the year, not murder of a child this year. but over the years there have been dozens of innocent children killed in the cross fire
week we've seen to budgets slated announcement coming out of the pentagon. one i was looking up just now because i was going to remember the numbers, and that is that the pentagon is beefing up its private security force, taking it from 900, to 4000, and putting a few billion dollars into it. the other one that is apparently being beefed up in these times of budgetary constraints are the special forces. tom, would you just talk about a generally? fred, if you talk about that not just in afghanistan but the broader battle at the nature of it and then we'll come over to transit and the nonexistent challenge that faces us in asia. >> i will try to be brief, danny. look, these new capabilities, cyber operations or whatever you want to call them, are certainly necessary, needed, and our abilities to exploit, you know, the electromagnetic spectrum continued as the internet is pretty critical. but it's not qualitatively different from other forms of intelligence gathering or, you know, attempts to, either by prop 10, or by direct attack, affect the military or strategic situation. the fondn
reasons, the pentagon and the planners have made their own case to the president. and with the new resource problem we confronted in mali, look what it took to support french against al qaeda sub contractors. if we can't do that when in fact americans are held hostage and killed, what kind of response do you really expect for . >> is that a consequence of the u.s. not getting involved in mali earlier? >> what is the implication from that we in effect need to be involved -- . >> the u.s. has been concerned about mali for at least eight nows. -- months only now there's a discussion about where we should do more. >> look, in the time of the great extra cater. we are -- that -- what is threaten, our foreign policy is not manic interventionism right now. that's not what we have to worry about here. >> let's move on. if you have a question, raise your hand. i'm going ask you to identify yourself. keep your question short. let's go to [inaudible] of radio-- and then go to the woman right here in the black and hand the microphone to her. >> hi, my name is -- [inaudible] that syria is part
and commented on the pentagon lifting of the ban on women in the front lines of combat. one of the speakers was the first female pilot to fly in combat. here's a little of what she had to say. >> sitting in a squatter officer school, i was getting ready to go to fighter training, i just completed the triathlon, a bunch of injured 3, special forces, i take to their -- kicked their butts, and you had guys saying, "women don't have the endurance to do, admissions." you want to go outside and talk about this? [laughter] let's go for a run. the difficulty and the reason -- and seeing it even in the debates that are going on even though the train has left the station, a lot of people who are against this thing get away with you have been excluded from doing this, you have not done it, i have done it, therefore you cannot do it. i don't know if you have seen the nuances on tv lately. sure, you have been in combat and engaged with the enemy anbut that is the different from sustained operations. that is the language you are hearing, on fox, and it might. [laughter] -- fox, anyway. [laughter] justin
in new york. the pentagon is broken. what do we know about al qaeda? did we know that members of this network, all this information we take for granted now? >> we did not know that much. we did not know who was responsible for 9/11. we had a few assets that provided us some peripheral information. we did not know very much. it took a long time for us to be in a position to really learn what was going on. in march of 2002, we captured al zabeta. we recognized that we had to do something different. contrary to what some people are saying, he initially provided a couple of pieces of information. then he shut down. we knew they were coming after us in the second wave of attacks. we knew that they had a nuclear program. they had a biological weapons program. we thought we needed to do something different. that is when the enhanced interrogation program came into existence. he went through the program, started in august of 2002 for 20 days or so. a few weeks later we captured a major player. he was a go-between. this was the key to all of that. we forget that it was not just osama b
in defense spending. and that's because the pentagon is getting ready for these sequester cuts that will start on march 1st. so they're starting to cut back on their spending to prepare for that. so if you take out -- what has happened in government spending, the economy grew by about 1.3%. that's still pretty anemic and i think it suggests we're not out of the woods yet. brooke, let me tell you some good news because i don't want to be the grim reaper here. >> give me the good news. >> since january, the economy has actually done a lot better. you have seen the numbers on housing. they're much improved. that means more construction jobs, right? we have seen some of the initial unemployment claims numbers that are down, meaning that it looks like we're going to get a pretty decent jobs report on friday. the energy picture looks pretty good. so, you know, it's discouraging that the fourth quarter was so lousy. let's keep our fingers crossed we get a revival of growth this quarter. >> that was the first quarter. we're looking at the current quarter and the dow looking awesome, if
of the partnership that the state department has forms with the pentagon first with bob gates and then mike mullen and then leon panetta and marty dempsey. by the same token america's traditional allies and friends in europe and east asia remains a valuable partners on nearly everything we do and we have spent considerable energy strengthening those bonds over the past four years. and i would be quick to add the u.n., the imf and the world bank and nato are also still essential. but all of our institutions and our relationships need to be modernized, and complemented by new institutions, relationships and partnerships that are tailored for new challenges and modeled to the needs of a variable landscape. like how we elevated the g20 during the financial crisis or created the climate and clean air coalition out of the state department to fight short-lived pollutants like black carbon or work with partners like turkey, where the two listed up the first global counterterrorism form. we are also working more than ever with invigorated regional organizations. consider the african union in somalia and th
. i am very proud of the partnership that the state department has formed with the pentagon versus we on panetta and marty dempsey. by the same token americans traditional allies or friends in europe and east asia remain a valuable partner on nearly everything we do. we have spent considerable energy strengthening those bonds over the past four years. and i would would be clicked to add the u.n. the imf and the world bank and nato are also still essential. but all of our institutions and our relationships need to be modernized and complemented by new institutions, relationships and partnerships that are tailored for new challenges and models to the needs of a variable landscape. like how we elevated the chi 20 during the financial crisis, or created the climate and clean air coalition out of the state department to fight short lived pollutants like black carbon or worked with partners like turkey where the two of us stood up the first global counterterrorism forum. we are also working more than ever with invigorated regional organizations. consider the african union in somalia and the
or the west. bill: we'll wait for more news out of the state department and the pentagon today. thank you, john bolton, mr. ambassador, good to have you here. 22 minutes before the hour, martha. martha: there are new concerns about al-qaida's growing influence in north africa and their desire to strike more western targets. this comes after last month's hostage crisis at an algerian gas plant that left 30 people dead, including three americans. our chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge live in washington with more. how advanced is this plotting. >> senior u.s. intelligence officials discuss the threat picture in north africa. before this morning's attack on the u.s. embassy in turkey intelligence officials describing to hit western as well as u.s. car gets as aspirational as the goal of al-qaida in north africa, not just concrete plots with established planning. the attack on the gas plant in mid january, the hostage crisis there led secretary of state hillary clinton to concede that the threat to u.s. interests in the region was growing as these groups pull their resources
by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- that is what we call a leading answer. perception need to catch up with reality. the department has moved light years ahead. president obama has continued to ask congress for the resources we need to do that. women talk about the interaction with the private-sector, which we do in a number of areas already -- when we talk about the interaction with the private sector, which we do in a number of areas already, the part that controls the core infrastructure with our statutory irresponsibility to help protect the nation's infrastructure. when we talk about linking those things together from a security perspective, we are not talking about a regulatory overlaid. we're talking about how do you take part of our country that is -
-- september 1, 2001. there is smoke in the ground in new york. the pentagon is broken. what do we know about al qaeda @? did we know that members of this network, all this information we take for granted now? >> we did not know that much. we did not know who was responsible for 9/11. we had a few assets of the provided us some peripheral information. we did not know very much. it took a long time for us to be in a position to really learn what was going on. in march of 2002, we captured al zabeta. we recognized that we had to do something different. contrary to what some people are saying, he initially provided a couple of pieces of information. then he shut down. we knew they were coming after us in the second wave of attacks. we knew that they had a nuclear program. they had a biological weapons program. we thought we needed to do something different. that is when the enhanced interrogations program came into existence. he went through the program, started in august of 2002 for 20 days or so. if you later -- if you sit recaptured a major player. he was a go-between. this was the key to all
, a billion dollars from special education. $3 billion from the pentagon's defense sfund. $7 billion from army operations. and earthworm does some work for the defense department. so earthworm could get hurt in this, couldn't it? >> that's right. the number one function of the federal government is to keep the people safe and representing the highest concentration of men and women in uniform, i can tell you that these cuts are irresponsible even if i believe we should reduce federal spending. it hurts job creation. there's a better path forward. and we should reduce it over time not over night. >> go ahead. >> there's no question about what he says it's true about the defense cuts. the secretary of defense said it would be catastrophic to let sequester hit the military for half a trillion -- >> but you still think it's an option -- >> half a trillion dollars. let me put the other side to you. i should add too that sequester doesn't do anything about the greatest underlying problem with regard to spending. and that has to do with the expansion of the welfare state and entitlement programs and t
essential. i'm proud of the partnerships the state department has formed with the pentagon. america's traditional allies and friends in europe and east asia remain in valuable partners in nearly everything we do. we've spent energy strengthening those bonds over the past four years. the un and world bank and nato are still essentials. all of our institutions and relationships check need to be modernized and complemented by new institutions and partnerships that are tailored for new challenges and model to the needs of a variable landscape. like how we elevated the g-20 during the financial crisis or created the climate and clean air coalition to fight short live pollutants like black carbon. or work with parties where we stood up the first global terrorism forum. we are working with organizations. consider the arab league in libya. even the lower mekong initiative that we created to help reintegrate burma into its neighborhood and try to work across national boundaries on whether dams should or should not be billult. ilt. world, people want to actually show up. a secretary state mig
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)